browdernetwork:

While participating on a panel devoted to showrunners at WonderCon Anaheim Saturday, Rockne S. O’Bannon (Revolution) provided an update on the movie version of one of his most beloved, cancelled shows: Farscape.

“We are, in fact, in the script stage of a Farscape feature,” O’Bannon announced to a packed house that couldn’t be more excited.

Please be true

msjwilly:

flavorpill:

Thks ass.Here’s an excellent sampling of 25 women who are not only funny, they’re f’ing hysterical.

25 Female Comedians Everyone Should Know

Woah. This kicks ass!

Agreed

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

(via counterpunches)

Tags: all that

Anybody looking for Chocolate Jesus….clothing store?
Okinawa has it all!

Anybody looking for Chocolate Jesus….clothing store?
Okinawa has it all!

Secret beach

Secret beach

theequeenoffuckingeverything:

Literally the best bromance to ever bromance

(Source: darkchocolateandtea, via pizza)

opticallyaroused:

Spectacular Photography by Aaron Feinberg

(Source: afeinbergphotography.com, via myfavouritecolourisstripes)

smartgirlsattheparty:

ijustloveyoutubers:

Grace is in the same list (compiled by MTV!) as Tina Fey and Amy Poehler!

Did you know that Amy Poehler once interviewed gracehelbig for an episode of Smart Girls at the Party? You can watch it here :)

So cool

whynotelsanna:

griddlemethis:

Pancake with all the colors of the wind.

i can’t even make a circular pancake what the fuck is this shit

that’s why I had that song stuck in my head…I was meant to find this. It’s glorious 

whynotelsanna:

griddlemethis:

Pancake with all the colors of the wind.

i can’t even make a circular pancake what the fuck is this shit

that’s why I had that song stuck in my head…I was meant to find this. It’s glorious 

(via mydrunkkitchen)

latimes:

The Philippine Supreme Court has upheld a law guaranteeing access to birth control and sex education. 

President Benigno Aquino III signed the legislation in December 2012, but its implementation has been on hold following challenges from the Roman Catholic Church and conservative politicians who questioned its constitutionality.

Top photo: Supporters of the law celebrate in front of the court’s summer residence in Baguio City, north of Manila. Bottom photo: Opponents react to the ruling. Both photos: AFP/Getty Images

(via smartgirlsattheparty)